Joann Weiner

Joann Weiner

Title:
Director, Master of Arts in Applied Economics
Faculty: Associate
Office:
340
Address: Monroe Hall
2115 G St. NW
Washington
District Of Columbia
20052
United States
Phone: 202-994-6150
Email:
jmweiner@gwu.edu

Areas of Expertise

Public economics, tax policy, applied microeconomics

Joann M. Weiner is an associate professor of economics and Director of the Applied Economics graduate program.  Weiner received her M.A. and Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University and her B.S. in Business Administration from the University of California at Berkeley.  She has taught at GW since September 2006.  From 1999 to 2006, she lived in Brussels where she taught public economics at the Saint Louis University, worked as a consultant for the European Commission on its study of company tax reform, and was the senior economics correspondent for Tax Notes International.  Prior to moving to Brussels, she served as a senior economist in the Office of Tax Policy at the U.S. Treasury Department.  She also has written for The Washington Post, Bloomberg Government, AOL’s Politics Daily, and the numerous publications of the non-profit publisher Tax Analysts.  She is a former member of the Board of the EC Tax Review.  Before starting graduate school, she worked at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, Lehman Brothers, and Risk Sciences Group.

Education

M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University
B.S., University of California, Berkeley

Publications

Weiner is the author of Company Tax Reform in the European Union. Guidance from the United States and Canada on Implementing Formulary Apportionment in the EU and a co-author of the Test Bank for Laurence M. Ball’s Money, Banking and Financial Markets. She has published articles in a number of leading economics and tax journals, including the National Tax Journal, Florida Tax Journal, International Tax and Public Finance, and The State and Local Tax Lawyer, among others.  The European Commission published her research paper as “Formulary Apportionment and Group Taxation in the European Union,” Taxation Working Paper No. 8.

Her primary professional interests are in the areas of tax policy, applied microeconomics, behavioral economics, and the financial crisis. She is particularly interested in exploring how companies choose to replace workers with machines, how consumer theory applies in real world situations, such as surge pricing in the ride-sharing economy, and how game theory and behavioral economics may help explain the causes and consequences of the recent financial crisis and the ongoing crisis in Greece.  She is an expert in the corporate income tax system known as Formulary Apportionment and is regularly invited to speak on the topic.

Classes Taught

Econ 2101:           Intermediate Undergraduate Microeconomics (with calculus) 
Econ 3161:           Public Economics: Expenditure Policy
Econ 3162:           Public Economics: Tax Policy 
MBAD 6290:       Causes and Consequences of the Financial Crisis
Econ 6301:           Applied Microeconomic Theory (graduate level