Course Offerings

Spring 2024 Courses:

ECON 1001: Principles of Mathematics for Economics

Prepares students for college instruction in principles of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory, as well as instruction in business, social science, and basic science courses that do not require knowledge of calculus. Restricted to students who have successfully completed high school algebra I and basic geometry prior to matriculation and who have taken the Assessment and Learning in Knowledge Spaces (ALEKS) placement examination at GW; No minimum ALEKS score is required for this course.

ECON 1002: Introduction to Personal Finance

Students gain practical foundational knowledge on personal finance (budgeting, managing credit, financing an education, buying a car or a house, investing and saving for retirement) and an understanding of the importance of financial literacy.

ECON 1011: Principles of Economics I

Major economic principles, institutions, and problems in contemporary life. Microeconomics—supply and demand, the price system and how it works, competitive and monopolistic markets. PrerequisiteECON 1001 with a grade of B- or above or ALEKS test score of 61 or above. Credit cannot be earned for this course and HONR 2043.

ECON 1012: Principles of Economics II

Why do economies grow? Why do economies shrink? What are the causes and consequences of economic inequality? How are the economies of different countries interconnected? And how can governments affect economic performance? This course introduces how economists approach each of these questions, using the scientific method. Topics include unemployment, inflation, banking, interest rates, government spending, and the Federal Reserve System. We discuss different kinds of of government economic policy, including their purposes and limitations. PrerequisiteECON 1011 OR HONR 2043. Credit cannot be earned for this course and HONR 2044.

ECON 2101: Intermediate Microeconomic Theory

Analysis of household economic behavior, including derivation of demand functions. Analysis of firm behavior, including derivation of supply frameworks. Demand and supply interaction under various market structures and in factor markets. PrerequisitesECON 1011 or HONR 2043; and ECON 1012 or HONR 2044; and MATH 1221 or MATH 1231 or MATH 1252. Credit cannot be earned for this course and ECON 2103.

ECON 2102: Intermediate Macroeconomics Theory

Investigation of the determinants of national income, inflation, unemployment, and interest rates. Alternative business cycle theories, with emphasis on the role of imperfect information, uncertainty, and expectations. PrerequisitesECON 1011 or HONR 2043; and ECON 1012 or HONR 2044; and MATH 1221 or MATH 1231 or MATH 1252. Credit cannot be earned for this course and ECON 2104.

ECON 2121: Financial Economics

What role do banks and other financial institutions play in the economy? Why are they so large, and how should they be regulated? Why are they prone to crises that can bring down the national economy? How should regulators respond to the tremendous innovation in payment systems such as crypto-assets? Should the Federal Reserve create a central bank digital currency? These questions and more are studied in models of money and asset markets incorporating financial market frictions. Additional topics include markets for different assets such as equity shares, options and other derivatives, exchange rates and regulation in a global economy.  PrerequisitesECON 1011 and ECON 1012; or HONR 2043 and HONR 2044. Credit cannot be earned for this course and FINA 3301.

ECON 2123: Introduction to Econometrics

This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of econometrics. The field of econometrics encompasses a broad range of statistical methods used for empirical research in economics. Applications of the econometric methods studied in this course can be found across many different fields of economics, from estimating the labor market returns of social networks to the evaluation of state-level alcohol laws to empirically modelling the relationship between unemployment and inflation. The course starts with a study of some basic principles of probability and statistical estimation and inference. The remaining focus is primarily on multivariate linear regression. Students learn that regression is a versatile tool that can be used to investigate causal ("all else equal") relationships among economic variables, test economic models and hypotheses, and fit both linear and nonlinear statistical relationships. Some advanced topics (for example, difference-in-differences, instrumental variables, and time series methods) may be introduced, time permitting. Students learn how to carry out econometric analysis using statistical software (choice of software varies by section), which may culminate in the completion of an empirical project. Importantly, students also learn to critically assess the underlying assumptions of econometric methods so that they can make sound judgments regarding what conclusions should be drawn from a particular set of empirical results. PrerequisitesECON 1011 or HONR 2043; and ECON 1012 or HONR 2044; and MATH 1221 or MATH 1231; and STAT 1051 or STAT 1053 or STAT 1111. Same As: STAT 2123.

ECON 2136: Environmental & Natural Resource Economics

Analysis of a variety of environmental and natural resource problems. The economic causes of these problems, their consequences, and the relative merits of alternative policies for dealing with them. PrerequisitesECON 1011 and ECON 1012; or HONR 2043 and HONR 2044.

ECON 2151: Economic Development

The average resident is 80 times richer in the USA than in Burundi. Why? And what can be done about it? This course provides the economic foundations for understanding - and addressing - questions like these, and other issues affecting developing countries, and poorer areas. A key theme is that poverty itself can cause poverty, so that economies can get caught in a "development trap.” Consequently, the themes of economic growth, poverty, and inequality are core to the course. These issues are complex and so an array of topics are covered: education, labor, health, population, gender, institutions, taxation, governance, environment, climate change, and more. Students will become familiar with development policy through course work and through real world interactions with DC based international organizations. PrerequisitesECON 1011 or HONR 2043 and ECON 1012 or HONR 2044. Credit cannot be earned for this course and ECON 6250.

ECON 2157: Urban & Regional Economics

Are you curious about the dynamics that shape the cities and regions we call home? Do you want to understand the economic forces driving city growth and decline, urban sprawl, reasons for and cures of congested transportation systems, and the distribution of poverty? If you're ready to embark on an exciting journey into the heart of our urban landscapes, then "Urban and Regional Economics" is the course for you. This course employs basic microeconomic concepts to explain how households and firms make location decisions, influencing the relative sizes of cities and regions. Within this framework, we will explore: a) the existence, growth, and internal structure of cities; b) housing markets and effects of government housing policy; c) urban challenges prevalent in both developed and developing regions, such as crime, pollution, informal housing, and more; and d) various public policies aimed at mitigating these issues. Moreover, this course offers hands-on experience working with extensive datasets and engaging in empirical projects to assess the evolution of local real estate markets. PrerequisitesECON 1011 and ECON 1012.

ECON 2180: Survey of International Economics

Basic concepts of international trade and international finance, emphasizing policy issues. Does not satisfy ECON major or minor elective requirements if taken concurrent with or after successful completion of ECON 2181, or ECON 2182, or ECON 3181. PrerequisitesECON 1011 or HONR 2043; and ECON 1012 or HONR 2044. Credit cannot be earned for this course and ECON 6280.

ECON 2181: International Trade Theory & Policy

International trade and the effects of trade on consumers, producers, and workers; cause and effect of international movement of factors, e.g., foreign direct investment, outsourcing, and migration; impacts of trade policies and trade agreements. PrerequisitesECON 1011 or HONR 2043; and ECON 1012 or HONR 2044. Credit cannot be earned for this course and ECON 6283.

ECON 2182: International Macroeconomic Theory & Policy

Topics include the balance of payments, the determination of exchange rates and prices in open economies, the interaction of the exchange rate and domestic economic activity, international financial markets, and exchange rate and financial crises. PrerequisitesECON 1011 or HONR 2043; and ECON 1012 and HONR 2044. Credit cannot be earned for this course and ECON 6284.

ECON 2199
2199.10 - Human Capital refers to investments that are made in people, including schooling, job training, and migration. The course will investigate the determinants and the consequences of these investments.  Human capital affects all aspects of people's lives, including how much they earn, where they live, what goods and services they consume, whether they marry and have children, how much they work, and how long they live.  
2199.11 - Please email [email protected] to request course description.
2199.12 - Students will investigate Outer Space, the beginning & the present; determine the achievements and goals in Outer Space (possible benefits & costs); learn about Space Sectors (US, Chinese, Other countries, commercial, Defense, National and Commercial space stations); understand various services provided by satellites, the Future of Spacefaring, and the importance of International Cooperation.

 

ECON 3142: Labor Economics

If you've ever asked "when are we ever going to use this?" Econ 3142: Labor Economics is an applied course covering the empirics of how workers and firms respond to public policy. The course covers empirical analyses that evaluate the effectiveness of social welfare programs; the effects of the minimum wage; the consequences of education policy; the costs and benefits of immigration policy; and gender and racial disparities in the labor market. The goal of the course is to highlight the importance of research designs in making a compelling case for causality and testing the predictiveness of economic models. Students learn to critically evaluate real-world examples and what makes causal arguments more or less convincing, skills useful for writing proseminar theses. PrerequisitesECON 1011 or HONR 2043; and ECON 1012 or HONR 2044; and ECON 2101 or ECON 2103.

View the Syllabus for ECON 3142

ECON 3162: Public Finance - Taxation

Economic analysis of taxes. Topics include individual and corporate income taxes, payroll taxes, sales and excise taxes, property and wealth taxes, design of tax systems, and effects of taxation on labor and capital markets. PrerequisitesECON 1011 or HONR 2043; and ECON 1012 and HONR 2044; and ECON 2101 or ECON 2103.

ECON 3190: Law & Economics

An introduction to the economic analysis of legal systems. How laws alter behavior and how laws might be designed to satisfy efficiency and fairness criteria. PrerequisitesECON 1011 or HONR 2043; and ECON 1012 or HONR 2044; and ECON 2101 or ECON 2103.

ECON 3191: Game Theory

Introduction to game theory, covering concepts such as Nash equilibrium, evolutionary games, backward induction and subgame perfection, Bayesian–Nash games of imperfect information, adverse selection, and moral hazard. PrerequisitesECON 1011 or HONR 2043; and ECON 1012 or HONR 2044; and ECON 2101 or ECON 2103.

ECON 4198W: Proseminar in Economics

Preparation and presentation of a research paper in any field of economics agreed upon by the student and instructor. Restricted to seniors in the economics program. PrerequisitesECON 2101 or ECON 2103; and ECON 2102 or ECON 2104; and ECON 2123 or STAT 2123 or STAT 2112 or STAT 2118; and completion of at least three ECON elective courses taken at the 2000 level or above. Includes a significant engagement in writing as a form of critical inquiry and scholarly expression to satisfy the WID requirement.

 

Courses offered in previous semesters:

Click the dropdown to see all courses offered in the Fall 2023 semester:

ECON 1001: Principles of Mathematics for Economics

  • Prepares students for college instruction in principles of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory, as well as instruction in business, social science, and basic science courses that do not require knowledge of calculus. Restricted to students who have successfully completed high school algebra I and basic geometry prior to matriculation and who have taken the Assessment and Learning in Knowledge Spaces (ALEKS) placement examination at GW; No minimum ALEKS score is required for this course.

ECON 1011: Principles of Economics I

  • Major economic principles, institutions, and problems in contemporary life. Microeconomics—supply and demand, the price system and how it works, competitive and monopolistic markets. Prerequisite: ECON 1001 with a grade of B- or above or ALEKS test score of 61 or above. Credit cannot be earned for this course and HONR 2043.

ECON 1012: Principles of Economics II

  • Continuation of ECON 1011. Major economic principles, institutions, and problems in contemporary life. Topics in macroeconomics, including national income concepts, unemployment and inflation, institutions of monetary control. Prerequisite: ECON 1011 OR HONR 2043. Credit cannot be earned for this course and HONR 2044.

ECON 2101: Intermediate Microeconomic Theory

  • Analysis of household economic behavior, including derivation of demand functions. Analysis of firm behavior, including derivation of supply frameworks. Demand and supply interaction under various market structures and in factor markets. Prerequisites: ECON 1011 or HONR 2043; and ECON 1012 or HONR 2044; and MATH 1221 or MATH 1231 or MATH 1252. Credit cannot be earned for this course and ECON 2103.

ECON 2102: Intermediate Macroeconomics Theory

  • Investigation of the determinants of national income, inflation, unemployment, and interest rates. Alternative business cycle theories, with emphasis on the role of imperfect information, uncertainty, and expectations. Prerequisites: ECON 1011 or HONR 2043; and ECON 1012 or HONR 2044; and MATH 1221 or MATH 1231 or MATH 1252. Credit cannot be earned for this course and ECON 2104.

ECON 2103: Intermediate Microeconomic Theory - A Mathematical Approach

  • Analysis of household economic behavior, including derivation of demand functions, and of firm behavior, including derivation of supply frameworks; demand and supply interaction under various market structures and in factor markets; reliance on constrained and unconstrained optimization techniques when analyzing household and firm behavior. Corequisite: MATH 1232. Recommended for students pursuing the BS degree in economics. Prerequisites: ECON 1011 and ECON 1012; or HONR 2043 and HONR 2044; MATH 1221 or MATH 1231 or MATH 1252. Credit cannot be earned for this course and ECON 2101.

ECON 2121: Financial Economics

  • Economic analysis of key financial institutions, markets, and variables. Investigation of performance of asset markets and the roles of money, credit, interest rates, exchange rates. Examination of private sector institutions. Roles of regulators. Prerequisites: ECON 1011 and ECON 1012; or HONR 2043 and HONR 2044. Credit cannot be earned for this course and FINA 3301.

ECON 2123: Introduction to Econometrics

ECON 2151: Economic Development

ECON 2169: Introduction to the Economy of China

  • Background, organization, and operation of the economy. Appraisal of performance and analysis of problems of development. Prerequisites: ECON 1011 or HONR 2043 and ECON 1012 or HONR 2044.

ECON 2180: Survey of International Economics

  • Basic concepts of international trade and international finance, emphasizing policy issues. Does not satisfy ECON major or minor elective requirements if taken concurrent with or after successful completion of ECON 2181, or ECON 2182, or ECON 3181. Prerequisites: ECON 1011 or HONR 2043; and ECON 1012 or HONR 2044. Credit cannot be earned for this course and ECON 6280.

ECON 2181: International Trade Theory & Policy

  • International trade and the effects of trade on consumers, producers, and workers; cause and effect of international movement of factors, e.g., foreign direct investment, outsourcing, and migration; impacts of trade policies and trade agreements. Prerequisites: ECON 1011 or HONR 2043; and ECON 1012 or HONR 2044. Credit cannot be earned for this course and ECON 6283.

ECON 2182: International Macroeconomic Theory & Policy

  • Topics include the balance of payments, the determination of exchange rates and prices in open economies, the interaction of the exchange rate and domestic economic activity, international financial markets, and exchange rate and financial crises. Prerequisites: ECON 1011 or HONR 2043; and ECON 1012 and HONR 2044. Credit cannot be earned for this course and ECON 6284.

ECON 2199

  • 2199.10 - Economics of Outer Space
  • 2199.12 - Economics of Slavery

ECON 3142: Labor Economics

  • If you've ever asked "when are we ever going to use this?" Econ 3142: Labor Economics is an applied course covering the empirics of how workers and firms respond to public policy. The course covers empirical analyses that evaluate the effectiveness of social welfare programs; the effects of the minimum wage; the consequences of education policy; the costs and benefits of immigration policy; and gender and racial disparities in the labor market. The goal of the course is to highlight the importance of research designs in making a compelling case for causality and testing the predictiveness of economic models. Students learn to critically evaluate real-world examples and what makes causal arguments more or less convincing, skills useful for writing proseminar theses. Prerequisites: ECON 1011 or HONR 2043; and ECON 1012 or HONR 2044; and ECON 2101 or ECON 2103.
  • View the Syllabus for ECON 3142

ECON 3162: Public Finance - Taxation

  • Economic analysis of taxes. Topics include individual and corporate income taxes, payroll taxes, sales and excise taxes, property and wealth taxes, design of tax systems, and effects of taxation on labor and capital markets. Prerequisites: ECON 1011 or HONR 2043; and ECON 1012 and HONR 2044; and ECON 2101 or ECON 2103.

ECON 3191: Game Theory

  • Introduction to game theory, covering concepts such as Nash equilibrium, evolutionary games, backward induction and subgame perfection, Bayesian–Nash games of imperfect information, adverse selection, and moral hazard. Prerequisites: ECON 1011 or HONR 2043; and ECON 1012 or HONR 2044; and ECON 2101 or ECON 2103.

ECON 4198W: Proseminar in Economics

  • Preparation and presentation of a research paper in any field of economics agreed upon by the student and instructor. Restricted to seniors in the economics program. Prerequisites: ECON 2101 or ECON 2103; and ECON 2102 or ECON 2104; and ECON 2123 or STAT 2123 or STAT 2112 or STAT 2118; and completion of at least three ECON elective courses taken at the 2000 level or above. Includes a significant engagement in writing as a form of critical inquiry and scholarly expression to satisfy the WID requirement.
Click the dropdown to see all courses offered in the Spring 2023 semester:

ECON 1001: Principles of Mathematics for Economics

  • Prepares students for college instruction in principles of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory, as well as instruction in business, social science, and basic science courses that do not require knowledge of calculus. Restricted to students who have successfully completed high school algebra I and basic geometry prior to matriculation and who have taken the Assessment and Learning in Knowledge Spaces (ALEKS) placement examination at GW; No minimum ALEKS score is required for this course.

ECON 1011: Principles of Economics I

  • Major economic principles, institutions, and problems in contemporary life. Microeconomics—supply and demand, the price system and how it works, competitive and monopolistic markets. Prerequisite: ECON 1001 with a grade of B- or above or ALEKS test score of 61 or above. Credit cannot be earned for this course and HONR 2043.

ECON 1012: Principles of Economics II

  • Continuation of ECON 1011. Major economic principles, institutions, and problems in contemporary life. Topics in macroeconomics, including national income concepts, unemployment and inflation, institutions of monetary control. Prerequisite: ECON 1011 OR HONR 2043. Credit cannot be earned for this course and HONR 2044.

ECON 2101: Intermediate Microeconomic Theory

  • Analysis of household economic behavior, including derivation of demand functions. Analysis of firm behavior, including derivation of supply frameworks. Demand and supply interaction under various market structures and in factor markets. Prerequisites: ECON 1011 or HONR 2043; and ECON 1012 or HONR 2044; and MATH 1221 or MATH 1231 or MATH 1252. Credit cannot be earned for this course and ECON 2103.

ECON 2102: Intermediate Macroeconomics Theory

  • Investigation of the determinants of national income, inflation, unemployment, and interest rates. Alternative business cycle theories, with emphasis on the role of imperfect information, uncertainty, and expectations. Prerequisites: ECON 1011 or HONR 2043; and ECON 1012 or HONR 2044; and MATH 1221 or MATH 1231 or MATH 1252. Credit cannot be earned for this course and ECON 2104.

ECON 2121: Financial Economics

  • Economic analysis of key financial institutions, markets, and variables. Investigation of performance of asset markets and the roles of money, credit, interest rates, exchange rates. Examination of private sector institutions. Roles of regulators. Prerequisites: ECON 1011 and ECON 1012; or HONR 2043 and HONR 2044. Credit cannot be earned for this course and FINA 3301.

ECON 2123: Introduction to Econometrics

ECON 2136: Environmental & Natural Resource Economics

  • Analysis of a variety of environmental and natural resource problems. The economic causes of these problems, their consequences, and the relative merits of alternative policies for dealing with them. Prerequisites: ECON 1011 and ECON 1012; or HONR 2043 and HONR 2044.

ECON 2151: Economic Development

ECON 2157: Urban & Regional Economics

  • Analysis of the determinants of urban growth and development; firm location; the functioning of urban land and housing markets. Prerequisites: ECON 1011 and ECON 1012.

ECON 2167: Economics of Crime

  • The economics of crime is concerned with the economic rationale for criminal law and the criminal justice system, as opposed to civil law. It deals with questions of when and what to criminalize; whether to tax, fine, or use other sanctions; the determinants of the supply of criminal activity; the effects of policing, enforcement, and punishment. Behavioral economic approaches to crime prevention are considered. Models that explain the spatial concentration of crime and applications of game theory to inform policing. The relation between crime and economic development is also explored. The economics of crime illustrates how economists use standard research techniques to study human behavior in circumstances where explicit markets do not exist. Prerequisites: ECON 1011 or HONR 2043; and ECON 1012 or HONR 2044.

ECON 2180: Survey of International Economics

  • Basic concepts of international trade and international finance, emphasizing policy issues. Does not satisfy ECON major or minor elective requirements if taken concurrent with or after successful completion of ECON 2181, or ECON 2182, or ECON 3181. Prerequisites: ECON 1011 or HONR 2043; and ECON 1012 or HONR 2044. Credit cannot be earned for this course and ECON 6280.

ECON 2181: International Trade Theory & Policy

  • International trade and the effects of trade on consumers, producers, and workers; cause and effect of international movement of factors, e.g., foreign direct investment, outsourcing, and migration; impacts of trade policies and trade agreements. Prerequisites: ECON 1011 or HONR 2043; and ECON 1012 or HONR 2044. Credit cannot be earned for this course and ECON 6283.

ECON 2182: International Macroeconomic Theory & Policy

  • Topics include the balance of payments, the determination of exchange rates and prices in open economies, the interaction of the exchange rate and domestic economic activity, international financial markets, and exchange rate and financial crises. Prerequisites: ECON 1011 or HONR 2043; and ECON 1012 and HONR 2044. Credit cannot be earned for this course and ECON 6284.

ECON 2199

  • 2199.10 - Economics of Outer Space
  • 2199.11 - Fluctuations: Financial Markets

ECON 3142: Labor Economics

  • If you've ever asked "when are we ever going to use this?" Econ 3142: Labor Economics is an applied course covering the empirics of how workers and firms respond to public policy. The course covers empirical analyses that evaluate the effectiveness of social welfare programs; the effects of the minimum wage; the consequences of education policy; the costs and benefits of immigration policy; and gender and racial disparities in the labor market. The goal of the course is to highlight the importance of research designs in making a compelling case for causality and testing the predictiveness of economic models. Students learn to critically evaluate real-world examples and what makes causal arguments more or less convincing, skills useful for writing proseminar theses. Prerequisites: ECON 1011 or HONR 2043; and ECON 1012 or HONR 2044; and ECON 2101 or ECON 2103.
  • View the Syllabus for ECON 3142

ECON 3190: Law & Economics

ECON 3191: Game Theory

  • Introduction to game theory, covering concepts such as Nash equilibrium, evolutionary games, backward induction and subgame perfection, Bayesian–Nash games of imperfect information, adverse selection, and moral hazard. Prerequisites: ECON 1011 or HONR 2043; and ECON 1012 or HONR 2044; and ECON 2101 or ECON 2103.

ECON 3199: Advanced Topics in Econometrics

ECON 4198W: Proseminar in Economics

  • Preparation and presentation of a research paper in any field of economics agreed upon by the student and instructor. Restricted to seniors in the economics program. Prerequisites: ECON 2101 or ECON 2103; and ECON 2102 or ECON 2104; and ECON 2123 or STAT 2123 or STAT 2112 or STAT 2118; and completion of at least three ECON elective courses taken at the 2000 level or above. Includes a significant engagement in writing as a form of critical inquiry and scholarly expression to satisfy the WID requirement.